Category Archives: Courage

Dear Britain,

You have very recently been through a fairly traumatic event. Granted, not an earthquake or hurricane; not drought or a famine; not a terrorist attack or a war on your doorstep; but threats do not always come from external sources, and it is sometimes the internal threats that are more insidious and root their destruction more deeply into a society, causing cracks in the foundations. The EU referendum posed a question that strikes at the very core of your identity, and the circus around it ensured that you would be left with a burden of stress and anxiety. You’re anxious because you voted to remain, and now you worry for your future after exiting the EU. You’re anxious because you voted to leave – what if the decision is kicked into the long grass, smothered in the notorious red tape of the EU machine? You were manipulated into a state of fear by the main referendum campaigns, and it doesn’t look as though those fears are going to be allayed any time soon.

I suspect that short-sighted politicians thought that they could whip up this fear and then tell you ‘it’s all right’ like a soothing mamma, and you would go back to sleep. Not this time. Westminster has driven you a step too far to reassure you with well-meaning platitudes, and you have become far too used to politicians who make promises and then conveniently forget them a few months or years down the line.

I think that the anger towards your political leaders has been growing for some time. Anger that curled for a while in its lair, present but dormant while you were still able to pretend to yourself that the next government would have the answers. Anger that woke slowly and found its voice in that huge and unexpected vote against ‘the establishment’. And then it didn’t take long after the referendum for the whole edifice to come crumbling down – how quickly those campaign promises were reneged on! So much for triggering article 50 immediately after the referendum if that was the will of the people. So much for the extra £350 million a year for the NHS. So much for stopping the free movement of labour.

No wonder your anger sprang from its lair and pounced. Yes, you have directed it towards many different culprits, and expressed it in many different ways – you are after all an entity of multiple personalities – but I believe that there is a unity in that anger; that it springs from a sense of being betrayed, and a deep insecurity. After all, who is there left to trust?

You cannot thrive while you are insecure. And I believe that insecurity runs throughout the entirety of you: whether politician or constituent, public or private sector worker, Royal family member or Benefits Street family member. It runs deep into the core of your establishment, as it navigates its way through a changing global landscape of terrorism, Middle Eastern unrest and an uncertain global economy. No easy task, but those with public influence nevertheless have a huge responsibility to recognise their power to influence your mood, and to exert that power with caution and delicacy.

Dear Britain, I believe that you can thrive again. I believe that you can learn courage in the face of fear, courage that enables you to confront your own inadequacies and learn from them. I believe it is possible for you to rebuild trust, with patience and time. It will require you to question yourself over and over and over again, holding yourself to account for every decision made, and examining claims made through your media carefully before deciding for yourself whether they are true. You will need to be alert to the powerful influence of the private sector, and you will need to raise up a new generation of politicians who will not bow to its demands. Above all, you will need to believe that a better future is possible, one in which political honesty is no longer considered a weakness; one in which you don’t simply consume soundbites, but question the ways in which you are being influenced; one in which you are truly able to listen to and help those who are afraid or vulnerable. I believe you can become all of this – do you?

 

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The Return

It’s been a while, I know. I’m afraid I had to let this blog lapse whilst I did the whole returning to work after kids thing, which involved a great deal of puzzling out as to what I could do that would fit in with all the other things that I already did.

I think I may have come up with a working solution, which is in its early stages but nevertheless is looking hopeful. However just as I begin to establish a new career, of course, we happen to experience political upheaval in Britain such as I have never known before. Whilst on the one hand vaguely hoping that the outcome of the referendum won’t affect my business plan (such as it is), on the other I am acutely aware of the shock experienced by a political establishment whose complacent expectations were proved so misguided given the referendum result.

So that is why I am here again. There are so many, many questions raised in the wake of what you might call a cataclysmic event, and I want this to be a place where I and anyone else can ask those questions. It is in many ways a selfish project, since for me it is therapeutic to launch my thoughts into a public space, but I hope whoever ends up reading this will find it helpful in opening up and exploring their own questions as well. I’m sure I’m not the only person who has experienced restless nights and stress-infused days since the result came out. Nor am I the only one who wants to see a stronger, more compassionate and courageous Britain emerge from the chaos of what has just happened. Perhaps this blog can, in some small way, help to bring that about. I look forward to giving it a try, at any rate.

Why do we need heroes?

It occurred to me recently that the concept of the hero is one of the most powerful storylines present in any film or television show. Those who have the courage, confidence and strength to make the brave choices, to take the difficult path in order to protect the rest of us who are weak and vulnerable – these characters are prevalent in so many stories. Even films in which the hero theme isn’t obvious still use the idea of characters who drawn on courage and internal strength in order to achieve something for themselves or for others, and this seems to hook us into the story. Be it justice, freedom, personal growth or anything else, a struggle is involved. It may be less evident in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind than it is in the Dark Knight, but nevertheless the exertion of courage is present in both. So, I ask myself, why on earth is that? Is it because we’re drawn to those who bear the heavy burdens and make decisions for us, or is it because we see in those heroes a reflection of what we know is inside ourselves?

I think that what makes me a bit cross is that so often the implication is that there is only one hero, and the vast numbers of people they fight to protect are passive and incapable. It feels to me like a misrepresentation of humanity to say that one person fights the incoming aliens while the rest of us run fleeing and screaming off the screen and into obscurity. I know that stories wouldn’t be believable if they didn’t reflect the reality of human experience, and it is true that we struggle to overcome fear in dangerous situations, but I do think that the ‘one one behalf of millions’ representation is a bit of an overexaggeration. Do we love the hero more, the more people they have to protect? I suppose that’s possible, and that’s why we devour the films with the obvious hero theme. The cynic (or perhaps realist) in me says that it is a distortion of reality used by producers to make lots of money at the box office. But then perhaps there is some value in the hero story as it opens up the question to us, if we’re willing to engage with it, of how we might respond when a hero is needed.

Perhaps the draw to a hero story is both about the desire for protection and the need for our own courage to be revealed. Perhaps it needs to be both. There are times in which we need to be comforted, protected, defended; times when our need is greater than our ability to be strong. There are also times when we are called on to be brave for others, to protect them in turn as they go through their difficult times. To deny that humanity reflects the entire breadth of the spectrum of giving and receiving courage, would be to deny the fulness of our nature. And perhaps, after all, the best kind of hero is the one who enables us to both understand our own limits and unlock the potential within each of us to find the courage that life sometimes requires.